Deepwater Horizon

Oil Spill - Environment - Dispersant - Ecological

Impact - Geomechanics - Monitoring - Ecosystem






Simple Steps To More Environmentally Friendly Living

A lot of people want to live a more environmentally friendly lifestyle but they just donít know how. We are going to show you some tips and tricks to help you live a good life and still help the environment. The first thing you should do is always recycle. Every time you throw something in the garbage it will end up in a big waste site and eventually buried under ground. By recycling you are helping keep stuff out of the garbage pits and helping to find other uses for it. Spent garbage is used to make a variety of things.

Another thing you should do is buy an environmentally friendly car. When buying a car you can try to find a good hybrid. These cars usually run on gas and electricity. The objective by the dual fuels is to let the car get better mileage on one gallon of gas and to help it run cleaner. Consider buying solar cells to help power your house.

By using solar energy you can keep your electricity bill down and help the environment at the same time. If you donít have much space in your yard for solar panels consider setting them on your roof. The roof will usually have better exposure to sunlight and this will leave your yard open to other things. Another good way to live environmentally friendly is to keep trees and plants in your yard. Having a bare yard wonít let animals and nature have any place to be in your yard. Also, having shade trees will help keep your heating bill down during the summer. There are so many different ways to be environmentally friendly. If you wish to do good to the environment the best way is to not do anything to purposely harm it. If you make an effort not to try to ruin nature then it will thrive.


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Oil Spill Environment Dispersant Ecological
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Deepwater Horizon