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Deepwater Horizon

Oil Spill - Environment - Dispersant - Ecological

Impact - Geomechanics - Monitoring - Ecosystem






Trends In Antarctic Terrestrial And Limnetic Ecosystems

RRP $574.99

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The Antarctic provides a suite of scenarios useful for investigating the range of climate change effects on terrestrial and limnetic biota. The international SCAR program RiSCC (Regional Sensitivity to Climate Change in Antarctic Terrestrial and Limnetic Ecosystems) is investigating these scenarios with the goals of understanding the likely response of Antarctic biota to changing climates, and contributing to the development of broadly applicable theory concerning interactions between climate change, indigenous and introduced species, and ecosystem functioning. The program draws upon both new and existing data. The purpose of the book is to provide, based on the most up to date knowledge, a synthesis of the likely effects of climate change on Antarctic terrestrial and limnetic ecosystems and, thereby, to contribute to their management and conservation, based on the information. 'The book is described as a milestone as it has collected the most actual facts about the Antarctic region and allows us to look at the phenomenon from physical and biological perspectives. It is a 'must' for all who are concerned about our environment' - "SCAR newsletter: Issue 10, April 2007".


A Day In An Ecosystem (6-book Set)

RRP $416.99

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Take a journey to the words driest, coldest, and wildest places.


Pacific Salmon & Their Ecosystems

RRP $55.00

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The symposium "Pacific Salmon and Their Ecosystems: Status and Future Options',' and this book resulted from initial efforts in 1992 by Robert J. Naiman and Deanna J. Stouder to examine the problem of declining Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.). Our primary goal was to determine informational gaps. As we explored different scientific sources, state, provincial, and federal agencies, as well as non-profit and fishing organizations, we found that the information existed but was not being communicated across institutional and organizational boundaries. At this juncture, we decided to create a steering committee and plan a symposium to bring together researchers, managers, and resource users. The steering committee consisted of members from state and federal agencies, non-profit organizations, and private industry (see Acknowledgments for names and affiliations). In February 1993, we met at the University of Washington in Seattle to begin planning the symposium. The steering committee spent the next four months developing the conceptual framework for the symposium and the subsequent book. Our objectives were to accomplish the following: (1) assess changes in anadromous Pacific Northwest salmonid populations, (2) examine factors responsible for those changes, and (3) identify options available to society to restore Pacific salmon in the Northwest. The symposium on Pacific Salmon was held in Seattle, Washington, January 10-12, 1994. Four hundred and thirty-five people listened to oral presentations and examined more than forty posters over two and a half days. We made a deliberate attempt to draw in speakers and attendees from outside the Pacific Northwest.



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Oil Spill Environment Dispersant Ecological
Impact Geomechanics Monitoring Ecosystem

Deepwater Horizon